WLAN/WIFI - Wireless LAN

WLAN interface provide 802.11 (a/b/g/n/ac) wireless support (commonly referred to as Wi-Fi) by means of compatible hardware. If your hardware supports it, VyOS supports multiple logical wireless interfaces per physical device.

There are three modes of operation for a wireless interface:

  • WAP provides network access to connecting stations if the physical hardware supports acting as a WAP
  • A station acts as a Wi-Fi client accessing the network through an available WAP
  • Monitor, the system passively monitors any kind of wireless traffic

If the system detects an unconfigured wireless device, it will be automatically added the configuration tree, specifying any detected settings (for example, its MAC address) and configured to run in monitor mode.

Configuration

Common interface configuration

set interfaces wireless <interface> address <address | dhcp | dhcpv6>

Configure interface <interface> with one or more interface addresses.

  • address can be specified multiple times as IPv4 and/or IPv6 address, e.g. 192.0.2.1/24 and/or 2001:db8::1/64
  • dhcp interface address is received by DHCP from a DHCP server on this segment.
  • dhcpv6 interface address is received by DHCPv6 from a DHCPv6 server on this segment.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 address 192.0.2.1/24
set interfaces wireless wlan0 address 2001:db8::1/64
set interfaces wireless wlan0 address dhcp
set interfaces wireless wlan0 address dhcpv6
set interfaces wireless <interface> description <description>

Set a human readable, descriptive alias for this connection. Alias is used by e.g. the show interfaces command or SNMP based monitoring tools.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 description 'This is an awesome interface running on VyOS'
set interfaces wireless <interface> disable

Disable given <interface>. It will be placed in administratively down (A/D) state.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 disable
set interfaces wireless <interface> disable-flow-control

Ethernet flow control is a mechanism for temporarily stopping the transmission of data on Ethernet family computer networks. The goal of this mechanism is to ensure zero packet loss in the presence of network congestion.

The first flow control mechanism, the pause frame, was defined by the IEEE 802.3x standard.

A sending station (computer or network switch) may be transmitting data faster than the other end of the link can accept it. Using flow control, the receiving station can signal the sender requesting suspension of transmissions until the receiver catches up.

Use this command to disable the generation of Ethernet flow control (pause frames).

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 disable-flow-control
set interfaces wireless <interface> disable-link-detect

Use this command to direct an interface to not detect any physical state changes on a link, for example, when the cable is unplugged.

Default is to detects physical link state changes.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 disable-link-detect
set interfaces wireless <interface> mac <xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx>

Configure user defined MAC address on given <interface>.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 mac '00:01:02:03:04:05'
set interfaces wireless <interface> mtu <mtu>

Configure MTU on given <interface>. It is the size (in bytes) of the largest ethernet frame sent on this link.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 mtu 9000
set interfaces wireless <interface> ip arp-cache-timeout

Once a neighbor has been found, the entry is considered to be valid for at least for this specifc time. An entry’s validity will be extended if it receives positive feedback from higher level protocols.

This defaults to 30 seconds.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 ip arp-cache-timeout 180
set interfaces wireless <interface> ip disable-arp-filter

If set the kernel can respond to arp requests with addresses from other interfaces. This may seem wrong but it usually makes sense, because it increases the chance of successful communication. IP addresses are owned by the complete host on Linux, not by particular interfaces. Only for more complex setups like load-balancing, does this behaviour cause problems.

If not set (default) allows you to have multiple network interfaces on the same subnet, and have the ARPs for each interface be answered based on whether or not the kernel would route a packet from the ARP’d IP out that interface (therefore you must use source based routing for this to work).

In other words it allows control of which cards (usually 1) will respond to an arp request.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 ip disable-arp-filter
set interfaces wireless <interface> ip disable-forwarding

Configure interface-specific Host/Router behaviour. If set, the interface will switch to host mode and IPv6 forwarding will be disabled on this interface.

set interfaces wireless wlan0 ip disable-forwarding
set interfaces wireless <interface> ip enable-arp-accept

Define behavior for gratuitous ARP frames who’s IP is not already present in the ARP table. If configured create new entries in the ARP table.

Both replies and requests type gratuitous arp will trigger the ARP table to be updated, if this setting is on.

If the ARP table already contains the IP address of the gratuitous arp frame, the arp table will be updated regardless if this setting is on or off.

set interfaces wireless wlan0 ip enable-arp-accept
set interfaces wireless <interface> ip enable-arp-announce

Define different restriction levels for announcing the local source IP address from IP packets in ARP requests sent on interface.

Use any local address, configured on any interface if this is not set.

If configured, try to avoid local addresses that are not in the target’s subnet for this interface. This mode is useful when target hosts reachable via this interface require the source IP address in ARP requests to be part of their logical network configured on the receiving interface. When we generate the request we will check all our subnets that include the target IP and will preserve the source address if it is from such subnet. If there is no such subnet we select source address according to the rules for level 2.

set interfaces wireless wlan0 ip enable-arp-announce
set interfaces wireless <interface> ip enable-arp-ignore

Define different modes for sending replies in response to received ARP requests that resolve local target IP addresses:

If configured, reply only if the target IP address is local address configured on the incoming interface.

If this option is unset (default), reply for any local target IP address, configured on any interface.

set interfaces wireless wlan0 ip enable-arp-ignore
set interfaces wireless <interface> ip enable-proxy-arp

Use this command to enable proxy Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) on this interface. Proxy ARP allows an Ethernet interface to respond with its own MAC address to ARP requests for destination IP addresses on subnets attached to other interfaces on the system. Subsequent packets sent to those destination IP addresses are forwarded appropriately by the system.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 ip enable-proxy-arp
set interfaces wireless <interface> ip proxy-arp-pvlan

Private VLAN proxy arp. Basically allow proxy arp replies back to the same interface (from which the ARP request/solicitation was received).

This is done to support (ethernet) switch features, like RFC 3069, where the individual ports are NOT allowed to communicate with each other, but they are allowed to talk to the upstream router. As described in RFC 3069, it is possible to allow these hosts to communicate through the upstream router by proxy_arp’ing.

Note

Don’t need to be used together with proxy_arp.

This technology is known by different names:

  • In RFC 3069 it is called VLAN Aggregation
  • Cisco and Allied Telesyn call it Private VLAN
  • Hewlett-Packard call it Source-Port filtering or port-isolation
  • Ericsson call it MAC-Forced Forwarding (RFC Draft)
set interfaces wireless <interface> ip source-validation <strict | loose | disable>

Enable policy for source validation by reversed path, as specified in RFC 3704. Current recommended practice in RFC 3704 is to enable strict mode to prevent IP spoofing from DDos attacks. If using asymmetric routing or other complicated routing, then loose mode is recommended.

  • strict: Each incoming packet is tested against the FIB and if the interface is not the best reverse path the packet check will fail. By default failed packets are discarded.
  • loose: Each incoming packet’s source address is also tested against the FIB and if the source address is not reachable via any interface the packet check will fail.
  • disable: No source validation
set interfaces wireless <interface> ipv6 address autoconf

SLAAC RFC 4862. IPv6 hosts can configure themselves automatically when connected to an IPv6 network using the Neighbor Discovery Protocol via ICMPv6 router discovery messages. When first connected to a network, a host sends a link-local router solicitation multicast request for its configuration parameters; routers respond to such a request with a router advertisement packet that contains Internet Layer configuration parameters.

Note

This method automatically disables IPv6 traffic forwarding on the interface in question.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 ipv6 address autoconf
set interfaces wireless <interface> ipv6 address eui64 <prefix>

EUI-64 as specified in RFC 4291 allows a host to assign iteslf a unique 64-Bit IPv6 address.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 ipv6 address eui64 2001:db8:beef::/64
set interfaces wireless <interface> ipv6 address no-default-link-local

Do not assign a link-local IPv6 address to this interface.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 ipv6 address no-default-link-local
set interfaces wireless <interface> ipv6 disable-forwarding

Configure interface-specific Host/Router behaviour. If set, the interface will switch to host mode and IPv6 forwarding will be disabled on this interface.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 ipv6 disable-forwarding
set interfaces wireless <interface> vrf <vrf>

Place interface in given VRF instance.

See also

There is an entire chapter about how to configure a VRF, please check this for additional information.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vrf red

DHCP(v6)

set interfaces wireless <interface> dhcp-options client-id <description>

RFC 2131 states: The client MAY choose to explicitly provide the identifier through the ‘client identifier’ option. If the client supplies a ‘client identifier’, the client MUST use the same ‘client identifier’ in all subsequent messages, and the server MUST use that identifier to identify the client.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 dhcp-options client-id 'foo-bar'
set interfaces wireless <interface> dhcp-options host-name <hostname>

Instead of sending the real system hostname to the DHCP server, overwrite the host-name with this given-value.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 dhcp-options host-name 'VyOS'
set interfaces wireless <interface> dhcp-options vendor-class-id <vendor-id>

The vendor-class-id option can be used to request a specific class of vendor options from the server.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 dhcp-options vendor-class-id 'VyOS'
set interfaces wireless <interface> dhcp-options no-default-route

Only request an address from the DHCP server but do not request a default gateway.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 dhcp-options no-default-route
set interfaces wireless <interface> dhcpv6-options duid <duid>

The DHCP unique identifier (DUID) is used by a client to get an IP address from a DHCPv6 server. It has a 2-byte DUID type field, and a variable-length identifier field up to 128 bytes. Its actual length depends on its type. The server compares the DUID with its database and delivers configuration data (address, lease times, DNS servers, etc.) to the client.

set interfaces wireless wlan0 duid '0e:00:00:01:00:01:27:71:db:f0:00:50:56:bf:c5:6d'
set interfaces wireless <interface> dhcpv6-options parameters-only

This statement specifies dhcp6c to only exchange informational configuration parameters with servers. A list of DNS server addresses is an example of such parameters. This statement is useful when the client does not need stateful configuration parameters such as IPv6 addresses or prefixes.

set interfaces wireless wlan0 dhcpv6-options parameters-only
set interfaces wireless <interface> dhcpv6-options rapid-commit

When rapid-commit is specified, dhcp6c will include a rapid-commit option in solicit messages and wait for an immediate reply instead of advertisements.

set interfaces wireless wlan0 dhcpv6-options rapid-commit
set interfaces wireless <interface> dhcpv6-options temporary

Request only a temporary address and not form an IA_NA (Identity Association for Non-temporary Addresses) partnership.

set interfaces wireless wlan0 dhcpv6-options temporary

DHCPv6 Prefix Delegation (PD)

VyOS 1.3 (equuleus) supports DHCPv6-PD (RFC 3633). DHCPv6 Prefix Delegation is supported by most ISPs who provide native IPv6 for consumers on fixed networks.

set interfaces wireless <interface> dhcpv6-options pd <id> length <length>

Some ISPs by default only delegate a /64 prefix. To request for a specific prefix size use this option to request for a bigger delegation for this pd <id>. This value is in the range from 32 - 64 so you could request up to a /32 prefix (if your ISP allows this) down to a /64 delegation.

The default value corresponds to 64.

To request a /56 prefix from your ISP use:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 dhcpv6-options pd 0 length 56
set interfaces wireless <interface> dhcpv6-options pd <id> interface <delegatee> address <address>

Specify the interface address used locally on the interfcae where the prefix has been delegated to. ID must be a decimal integer.

It will be combined with the delegated prefix and the sla-id to form a complete interface address. The default is to use the EUI-64 address of the interface.

Example: Delegate a /64 prefix to interface eth8 which will use a local address on this router of <prefix>::ffff, as the address 65534 will correspond to ffff in hexadecimal notation.

set interfaces wireless wlan0 dhcpv6-options pd 0 interface eth8 address 65534
set interfaces wireless <interface> dhcpv6-options pd <id> interface <delegatee> sla-id <id>

Specify the identifier value of the site-level aggregator (SLA) on the interface. ID must be a decimal number greater then 0 which fits in the length of SLA IDs (see below).

Example: If ID is 1 and the client is delegated an IPv6 prefix 2001:db8:ffff::/48, dhcp6c will combine the two values into a single IPv6 prefix, 2001:db8:ffff:1::/64, and will configure the prefix on the specified interface.

set interfaces wireless wlan0 dhcpv6-options pd 0 interface eth8 sla-id 1

Wireless options

set interfaces wireless <interface> channel <number>
Channel number (IEEE 802.11), for 2.4Ghz (802.11 b/g/n) channels range from 1-14. On 5Ghz (802.11 a/h/j/n/ac) channels available are 0, 34 to 173
set interfaces wireless <interface> country-code <cc>

Country code (ISO/IEC 3166-1). Used to set regulatory domain. Set as needed to indicate country in which device is operating. This can limit available channels and transmit power.

Note

This option is mandatory in Access-Point mode.

set interfaces wireless <interface> disable-broadcast-ssid
Send empty SSID in beacons and ignore probe request frames that do not specify full SSID, i.e., require stations to know SSID.
set interfaces wireless <interface> expunge-failing-stations

Disassociate stations based on excessive transmission failures or other indications of connection loss.

This depends on the driver capabilities and may not be available with all drivers.

set interfaces wireless <interface> isolate-stations

Client isolation can be used to prevent low-level bridging of frames between associated stations in the BSS.

By default, this bridging is allowed.

set interfaces wireless <interface> max-stations

Maximum number of stations allowed in station table. New stations will be rejected after the station table is full. IEEE 802.11 has a limit of 2007 different association IDs, so this number should not be larger than that.

This defaults to 2007.

set interfaces wireless <interface> mgmt-frame-protection
Management Frame Protection (MFP) according to IEEE 802.11w
set interfaces wireless <interface> mode <a | b | g | n | ac>

Operation mode of wireless radio.

  • a - 802.11a - 54 Mbits/sec
  • b - 802.11b - 11 Mbits/sec
  • g - 802.11g - 54 Mbits/sec (default)
  • n - 802.11n - 600 Mbits/sec
  • ac - 802.11ac - 1300 Mbits/sec
set interfaces wireless <interface> physical-device <device>

Wireless hardware device used as underlay radio.

This defaults to phy0.

set interfaces wireless <interface> reduce-transmit-power <number>

Add Power Constraint element to Beacon and Probe Response frames.

This option adds Power Constraint element when applicable and Country element is added. Power Constraint element is required by Transmit Power Control.

Valid values are 0..255.

set interfaces wireless <interface> ssid <ssid>
SSID to be used in IEEE 802.11 management frames
set interfaces wireless <interface> type <access-point | station | monitor>

Wireless device type for this interface

  • access-point - Access-point forwards packets between other nodes
  • station - Connects to another access point
  • monitor - Passively monitor all packets on the frequency/channel

PPDU

set interfaces wireless <interface> capabilities require-ht
set interfaces wireless <interface> capabilities require-hvt
HT (High Throughput) capabilities (802.11n)
set interfaces wireless <interface> capabilities ht 40mhz-incapable
Device is incapable of 40 MHz, do not advertise. This sets [40-INTOLERANT]
set interfaces wireless <interface> capabilities ht auto-powersave
WMM-PS Unscheduled Automatic Power Save Delivery [U-APSD]
set interfaces wireless <interface> capabilities ht channel-set-width <ht20 | ht40+ | ht40->

Supported channel width set.

  • ht40- - Both 20 MHz and 40 MHz with secondary channel below the primary channel
  • ht40+ - Both 20 MHz and 40 MHz with secondary channel above the primary channel

Note

There are limits on which channels can be used with HT40- and HT40+. Following table shows the channels that may be available for HT40- and HT40+ use per IEEE 802.11n Annex J:

Depending on the location, not all of these channels may be available for use!

freq              HT40-           HT40+
2.4 GHz           5-13            1-7 (1-9 in Europe/Japan)
5 GHz             40,48,56,64     36,44,52,60

Note

40 MHz channels may switch their primary and secondary channels if needed or creation of 40 MHz channel maybe rejected based on overlapping BSSes. These changes are done automatically when hostapd is setting up the 40 MHz channel.

set interfaces wireless <interface> capabilities ht delayed-block-ack
Enable HT-delayed Block Ack [DELAYED-BA]
set interfaces wireless <interface> capabilities ht dsss-cck-40
DSSS/CCK Mode in 40 MHz, this sets [DSSS_CCK-40]
set interfaces wireless <interface> capabilities ht greenfield
This enables the greenfield option which sets the [GF] option
set interfaces wireless <interface> capabilities ht ldpc
Enable LDPC coding capability
set interfaces wireless <interface> capabilities ht lsig-protection
Enable L-SIG TXOP protection capability
set interfaces wireless <interface> capabilities ht max-amsdu <3839 | 7935>
Maximum A-MSDU length 3839 (default) or 7935 octets
set interfaces wireless <interface> capabilities ht short-gi <20 | 40>
Short GI capabilities for 20 and 40 MHz
set interfaces wireless <interface> capabilities ht smps <static | dynamic>
Spatial Multiplexing Power Save (SMPS) settings
set interfaces wireless <interface> capabilities ht stbc rx <num>
Enable receiving PPDU using STBC (Space Time Block Coding)
set interfaces wireless <interface> capabilities ht stbc tx
Enable sending PPDU using STBC (Space Time Block Coding)
VHT (Very High Throughput) capabilities (802.11ac)
set interfaces wireless <interface> capabilities vht antenna-count
Number of antennas on this card
set interfaces wireless <interface> capabilities vht antenna-pattern-fixed
Set if antenna pattern does not change during the lifetime of an association
set interfaces wireless <interface> capabilities vht beamform <single-user-beamformer | single-user-beamformee | multi-user-beamformer | multi-user-beamformee>

Beamforming capabilities:

  • single-user-beamformer - Support for operation as single user beamformer
  • single-user-beamformee - Support for operation as single user beamformee
  • multi-user-beamformer - Support for operation as single user beamformer
  • multi-user-beamformee - Support for operation as single user beamformer
set interfaces wireless <interface> capabilities vht center-channel-freq <freq-1 | freq-2> <number>

VHT operating channel center frequency - center freq 1 (for use with 80, 80+80 and 160 modes)

VHT operating channel center frequency - center freq 2 (for use with the 80+80 mode)

<number> must be from 34 - 173. For 80 MHz channels it should be channel + 6.

set interfaces wireless <interface> capabilities vht channel-set-width <0 | 1 | 2 | 3>
  • 0 - 20 or 40 MHz channel width (default)
  • 1 - 80 MHz channel width
  • 2 - 160 MHz channel width
  • 3 - 80+80 MHz channel width
set interfaces wireless <interface> capabilities vht ldpc
Enable LDPC (Low Density Parity Check) coding capability
set interfaces wireless <interface> capabilities vht link-adaptation
VHT link adaptation capabilities
set interfaces wireless <interface> capabilities vht max-mpdu <value>
Increase Maximum MPDU length to 7991 or 11454 octets (default 3895 octets)
set interfaces wireless <interface> capabilities vht max-mpdu-exp <value>
Set the maximum length of A-MPDU pre-EOF padding that the station can receive
set interfaces wireless <interface> capabilities vht short-gi <80 | 160>
Short GI capabilities
set interfaces wireless <interface> capabilities vht stbc rx <num>
Enable receiving PPDU using STBC (Space Time Block Coding)
set interfaces wireless <interface> capabilities vht stbc tx
Enable sending PPDU using STBC (Space Time Block Coding)
set interfaces wireless <interface> capabilities vht tx-powersave
Enable VHT TXOP Power Save Mode
set interfaces wireless <interface> capabilities vht vht-cf
Station supports receiving VHT variant HT Control field

Wireless options (Station/Client)

The example creates a wireless station (commonly referred to as Wi-Fi client) that accesses the network through the WAP defined in the above example. The default physical device (phy0) is used.

set interfaces wireless wlan0 type station
set interfaces wireless wlan0 address dhcp
set interfaces wireless wlan0 ssid Test
set interfaces wireless wlan0 security wpa

Resulting in

interfaces {
  [...]
  wireless wlan0 {
    address dhcp
    security {
      wpa {
        passphrase "12345678"
      }
    }
    ssid TEST
    type station
  }

Security

WPA and WPA2 Enterprise in combination with 802.1x based authentication can be used to authenticate users or computers in a domain.

The wireless client (supplicant) authenticates against the RADIUS server (authentication server) using an EAP method configured on the RADIUS server. The WAP (also referred to as authenticator) role is to send all authentication messages between the supplicant and the configured authentication server, thus the RADIUS server is responsible for authenticating the users.

The WAP in this example has the following characteristics:

  • IP address 192.168.2.1/24
  • Network ID (SSID) Enterprise-TEST
  • WPA passphrase 12345678
  • Use 802.11n protocol
  • Wireless channel 1
  • RADIUS server at 192.168.3.10 with shared-secret VyOSPassword
set interfaces wireless wlan0 address '192.168.2.1/24'
set interfaces wireless wlan0 type access-point
set interfaces wireless wlan0 channel 1
set interfaces wireless wlan0 mode n
set interfaces wireless wlan0 ssid 'TEST'
set interfaces wireless wlan0 security wpa mode wpa2
set interfaces wireless wlan0 security wpa cipher CCMP
set interfaces wireless wlan0 security wpa radius server 192.168.3.10 key 'VyOSPassword'
set interfaces wireless wlan0 security wpa radius server 192.168.3.10 port 1812

Resulting in

interfaces {
  [...]
  wireless wlan0 {
        address 192.168.2.1/24
        channel 1
        mode n
        security {
            wpa {
                cipher CCMP
                mode wpa2
                radius {
                    server 192.168.3.10 {
                        key 'VyOSPassword'
                        port 1812
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        ssid "Enterprise-TEST"
        type access-point
    }
}
system {
  [...]
  wifi-regulatory-domain DE
}

VLAN

Regular VLANs (802.1q)

IEEE 802.1q, often referred to as Dot1q, is the networking standard that supports virtual LANs (VLANs) on an IEEE 802.3 Ethernet network. The standard defines a system of VLAN tagging for Ethernet frames and the accompanying procedures to be used by bridges and switches in handling such frames. The standard also contains provisions for a quality-of-service prioritization scheme commonly known as IEEE 802.1p and defines the Generic Attribute Registration Protocol.

Portions of the network which are VLAN-aware (i.e., IEEE 802.1q conformant) can include VLAN tags. When a frame enters the VLAN-aware portion of the network, a tag is added to represent the VLAN membership. Each frame must be distinguishable as being within exactly one VLAN. A frame in the VLAN-aware portion of the network that does not contain a VLAN tag is assumed to be flowing on the native VLAN.

The standard was developed by IEEE 802.1, a working group of the IEEE 802 standards committee, and continues to be actively revised. One of the notable revisions is 802.1Q-2014 which incorporated IEEE 802.1aq (Shortest Path Bridging) and much of the IEEE 802.1d standard.

802.1q VLAN interfaces are represented as virtual sub-interfaces in VyOS. The term used for this is vif.

set interfaces wireless <interface> vif <vlan-id>

Create a new VLAN interface on interface <interface> using the VLAN number provided via <vlan-id>.

You can create multiple VLAN interfaces on a physical interface. The VLAN ID range is from 0 to 4094.

Note

Only 802.1Q-tagged packets are accepted on Ethernet vifs.

set interfaces wireless <interface> vif <vlan-id> address <address | dhcp | dhcpv6>

Configure interface <interface> with one or more interface addresses.

  • address can be specified multiple times as IPv4 and/or IPv6 address, e.g. 192.0.2.1/24 and/or 2001:db8::1/64
  • dhcp interface address is received by DHCP from a DHCP server on this segment.
  • dhcpv6 interface address is received by DHCPv6 from a DHCPv6 server on this segment.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif 10 address 192.0.2.1/24
set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif 10 address 2001:db8::1/64
set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif 10 address dhcp
set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif 10 address dhcpv6
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif <vlan-id> description <description>

Set a human readable, descriptive alias for this connection. Alias is used by e.g. the show interfaces command or SNMP based monitoring tools.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif 10 description 'This is an awesome interface running on VyOS'
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif <vlan-id> disable

Disable given <interface>. It will be placed in administratively down (A/D) state.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif 10 disable
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif <vlan-id> disable-link-detect

Use this command to direct an interface to not detect any physical state changes on a link, for example, when the cable is unplugged.

Default is to detects physical link state changes.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif 10 disable-link-detect
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif <vlan-id> mac <xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx>

Configure user defined MAC address on given <interface>.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif 10 mac '00:01:02:03:04:05'
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif <vlan-id> mtu <mtu>

Configure MTU on given <interface>. It is the size (in bytes) of the largest ethernet frame sent on this link.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif 10 mtu 9000
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif <vlan-id> ip arp-cache-timeout

Once a neighbor has been found, the entry is considered to be valid for at least for this specifc time. An entry’s validity will be extended if it receives positive feedback from higher level protocols.

This defaults to 30 seconds.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif 10 ip arp-cache-timeout 180
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif <vlan-id> ip disable-arp-filter

If set the kernel can respond to arp requests with addresses from other interfaces. This may seem wrong but it usually makes sense, because it increases the chance of successful communication. IP addresses are owned by the complete host on Linux, not by particular interfaces. Only for more complex setups like load-balancing, does this behaviour cause problems.

If not set (default) allows you to have multiple network interfaces on the same subnet, and have the ARPs for each interface be answered based on whether or not the kernel would route a packet from the ARP’d IP out that interface (therefore you must use source based routing for this to work).

In other words it allows control of which cards (usually 1) will respond to an arp request.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif 10 ip disable-arp-filter
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif <vlan-id> ip disable-forwarding

Configure interface-specific Host/Router behaviour. If set, the interface will switch to host mode and IPv6 forwarding will be disabled on this interface.

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif 10 ip disable-forwarding
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif <vlan-id> ip enable-arp-accept

Define behavior for gratuitous ARP frames who’s IP is not already present in the ARP table. If configured create new entries in the ARP table.

Both replies and requests type gratuitous arp will trigger the ARP table to be updated, if this setting is on.

If the ARP table already contains the IP address of the gratuitous arp frame, the arp table will be updated regardless if this setting is on or off.

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif 10 ip enable-arp-accept
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif <vlan-id> ip enable-arp-announce

Define different restriction levels for announcing the local source IP address from IP packets in ARP requests sent on interface.

Use any local address, configured on any interface if this is not set.

If configured, try to avoid local addresses that are not in the target’s subnet for this interface. This mode is useful when target hosts reachable via this interface require the source IP address in ARP requests to be part of their logical network configured on the receiving interface. When we generate the request we will check all our subnets that include the target IP and will preserve the source address if it is from such subnet. If there is no such subnet we select source address according to the rules for level 2.

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif 10 ip enable-arp-announce
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif <vlan-id> ip enable-arp-ignore

Define different modes for sending replies in response to received ARP requests that resolve local target IP addresses:

If configured, reply only if the target IP address is local address configured on the incoming interface.

If this option is unset (default), reply for any local target IP address, configured on any interface.

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif 10 ip enable-arp-ignore
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif <vlan-id> ip enable-proxy-arp

Use this command to enable proxy Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) on this interface. Proxy ARP allows an Ethernet interface to respond with its own MAC address to ARP requests for destination IP addresses on subnets attached to other interfaces on the system. Subsequent packets sent to those destination IP addresses are forwarded appropriately by the system.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif 10 ip enable-proxy-arp
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif <vlan-id> ip proxy-arp-pvlan

Private VLAN proxy arp. Basically allow proxy arp replies back to the same interface (from which the ARP request/solicitation was received).

This is done to support (ethernet) switch features, like RFC 3069, where the individual ports are NOT allowed to communicate with each other, but they are allowed to talk to the upstream router. As described in RFC 3069, it is possible to allow these hosts to communicate through the upstream router by proxy_arp’ing.

Note

Don’t need to be used together with proxy_arp.

This technology is known by different names:

  • In RFC 3069 it is called VLAN Aggregation
  • Cisco and Allied Telesyn call it Private VLAN
  • Hewlett-Packard call it Source-Port filtering or port-isolation
  • Ericsson call it MAC-Forced Forwarding (RFC Draft)
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif <vlan-id> ip source-validation <strict | loose | disable>

Enable policy for source validation by reversed path, as specified in RFC 3704. Current recommended practice in RFC 3704 is to enable strict mode to prevent IP spoofing from DDos attacks. If using asymmetric routing or other complicated routing, then loose mode is recommended.

  • strict: Each incoming packet is tested against the FIB and if the interface is not the best reverse path the packet check will fail. By default failed packets are discarded.
  • loose: Each incoming packet’s source address is also tested against the FIB and if the source address is not reachable via any interface the packet check will fail.
  • disable: No source validation
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif <vlan-id> ipv6 address autoconf

SLAAC RFC 4862. IPv6 hosts can configure themselves automatically when connected to an IPv6 network using the Neighbor Discovery Protocol via ICMPv6 router discovery messages. When first connected to a network, a host sends a link-local router solicitation multicast request for its configuration parameters; routers respond to such a request with a router advertisement packet that contains Internet Layer configuration parameters.

Note

This method automatically disables IPv6 traffic forwarding on the interface in question.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif 10 ipv6 address autoconf
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif <vlan-id> ipv6 address eui64 <prefix>

EUI-64 as specified in RFC 4291 allows a host to assign iteslf a unique 64-Bit IPv6 address.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif 10 ipv6 address eui64 2001:db8:beef::/64
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif <vlan-id> ipv6 address no-default-link-local

Do not assign a link-local IPv6 address to this interface.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif 10 ipv6 address no-default-link-local
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif <vlan-id> ipv6 disable-forwarding

Configure interface-specific Host/Router behaviour. If set, the interface will switch to host mode and IPv6 forwarding will be disabled on this interface.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif 10 ipv6 disable-forwarding
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif <vlan-id> vrf <vrf>

Place interface in given VRF instance.

See also

There is an entire chapter about how to configure a VRF, please check this for additional information.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif 10 vrf red

DHCP(v6)

set interfaces wireless <interface> vif <vlan-id> dhcp-options client-id <description>

RFC 2131 states: The client MAY choose to explicitly provide the identifier through the ‘client identifier’ option. If the client supplies a ‘client identifier’, the client MUST use the same ‘client identifier’ in all subsequent messages, and the server MUST use that identifier to identify the client.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif 10 dhcp-options client-id 'foo-bar'
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif <vlan-id> dhcp-options host-name <hostname>

Instead of sending the real system hostname to the DHCP server, overwrite the host-name with this given-value.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif 10 dhcp-options host-name 'VyOS'
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif <vlan-id> dhcp-options vendor-class-id <vendor-id>

The vendor-class-id option can be used to request a specific class of vendor options from the server.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif 10 dhcp-options vendor-class-id 'VyOS'
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif <vlan-id> dhcp-options no-default-route

Only request an address from the DHCP server but do not request a default gateway.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif 10 dhcp-options no-default-route
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif <vlan-id> dhcpv6-options duid <duid>

The DHCP unique identifier (DUID) is used by a client to get an IP address from a DHCPv6 server. It has a 2-byte DUID type field, and a variable-length identifier field up to 128 bytes. Its actual length depends on its type. The server compares the DUID with its database and delivers configuration data (address, lease times, DNS servers, etc.) to the client.

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif 10 duid '0e:00:00:01:00:01:27:71:db:f0:00:50:56:bf:c5:6d'
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif <vlan-id> dhcpv6-options parameters-only

This statement specifies dhcp6c to only exchange informational configuration parameters with servers. A list of DNS server addresses is an example of such parameters. This statement is useful when the client does not need stateful configuration parameters such as IPv6 addresses or prefixes.

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif 10 dhcpv6-options parameters-only
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif <vlan-id> dhcpv6-options rapid-commit

When rapid-commit is specified, dhcp6c will include a rapid-commit option in solicit messages and wait for an immediate reply instead of advertisements.

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif 10 dhcpv6-options rapid-commit
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif <vlan-id> dhcpv6-options temporary

Request only a temporary address and not form an IA_NA (Identity Association for Non-temporary Addresses) partnership.

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif 10 dhcpv6-options temporary

DHCPv6 Prefix Delegation (PD)

VyOS 1.3 (equuleus) supports DHCPv6-PD (RFC 3633). DHCPv6 Prefix Delegation is supported by most ISPs who provide native IPv6 for consumers on fixed networks.

set interfaces wireless <interface> vif <vlan-id> dhcpv6-options pd <id> length <length>

Some ISPs by default only delegate a /64 prefix. To request for a specific prefix size use this option to request for a bigger delegation for this pd <id>. This value is in the range from 32 - 64 so you could request up to a /32 prefix (if your ISP allows this) down to a /64 delegation.

The default value corresponds to 64.

To request a /56 prefix from your ISP use:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif 10 dhcpv6-options pd 0 length 56
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif <vlan-id> dhcpv6-options pd <id> interface <delegatee> address <address>

Specify the interface address used locally on the interfcae where the prefix has been delegated to. ID must be a decimal integer.

It will be combined with the delegated prefix and the sla-id to form a complete interface address. The default is to use the EUI-64 address of the interface.

Example: Delegate a /64 prefix to interface eth8 which will use a local address on this router of <prefix>::ffff, as the address 65534 will correspond to ffff in hexadecimal notation.

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif 10 dhcpv6-options pd 0 interface eth8 address 65534
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif <vlan-id> dhcpv6-options pd <id> interface <delegatee> sla-id <id>

Specify the identifier value of the site-level aggregator (SLA) on the interface. ID must be a decimal number greater then 0 which fits in the length of SLA IDs (see below).

Example: If ID is 1 and the client is delegated an IPv6 prefix 2001:db8:ffff::/48, dhcp6c will combine the two values into a single IPv6 prefix, 2001:db8:ffff:1::/64, and will configure the prefix on the specified interface.

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif 10 dhcpv6-options pd 0 interface eth8 sla-id 1

QinQ (802.1ad)

Call for Contributions

This section needs improvements, examples and explanations.

Please take a look at the Contributing Guide for our Documentation.

IEEE 802.1ad was an Ethernet networking standard informally known as QinQ as an amendment to IEEE standard 802.1q VLAN interfaces as described above. 802.1ad was incorporated into the base 802.1q standard in 2011. The technique is also known as provider bridging, Stacked VLANs, or simply QinQ or Q-in-Q. “Q-in-Q” can for supported devices apply to C-tag stacking on C-tag (Ethernet Type = 0x8100).

The original 802.1q specification allows a single Virtual Local Area Network (VLAN) header to be inserted into an Ethernet frame. QinQ allows multiple VLAN tags to be inserted into a single frame, an essential capability for implementing Metro Ethernet network topologies. Just as QinQ extends 802.1Q, QinQ itself is extended by other Metro Ethernet protocols.

In a multiple VLAN header context, out of convenience the term “VLAN tag” or just “tag” for short is often used in place of “802.1q VLAN header”. QinQ allows multiple VLAN tags in an Ethernet frame; together these tags constitute a tag stack. When used in the context of an Ethernet frame, a QinQ frame is a frame that has 2 VLAN 802.1q headers (double-tagged).

In VyOS the terms vif-s and vif-c stand for the ethertype tags that are used.

The inner tag is the tag which is closest to the payload portion of the frame. It is officially called C-TAG (customer tag, with ethertype 0x8100). The outer tag is the one closer/closest to the Ethernet header, its name is S-TAG (service tag with Ethernet Type = 0x88a8).

set interfaces wireless <interface> vif-s <vlan-id> vif-c <vlan-id> address <address | dhcp | dhcpv6>

Configure interface <interface> with one or more interface addresses.

  • address can be specified multiple times as IPv4 and/or IPv6 address, e.g. 192.0.2.1/24 and/or 2001:db8::1/64
  • dhcp interface address is received by DHCP from a DHCP server on this segment.
  • dhcpv6 interface address is received by DHCPv6 from a DHCPv6 server on this segment.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif-s 1000 vif-c 20 address 192.0.2.1/24
set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif-s 1000 vif-c 20 address 2001:db8::1/64
set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif-s 1000 vif-c 20 address dhcp
set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif-s 1000 vif-c 20 address dhcpv6
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif-s <vlan-id> vif-c <vlan-id> description <description>

Set a human readable, descriptive alias for this connection. Alias is used by e.g. the show interfaces command or SNMP based monitoring tools.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif-s 1000 vif-c 20 description 'This is an awesome interface running on VyOS'
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif-s <vlan-id> vif-c <vlan-id> disable

Disable given <interface>. It will be placed in administratively down (A/D) state.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif-s 1000 vif-c 20 disable
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif-s <vlan-id> vif-c <vlan-id> disable-link-detect

Use this command to direct an interface to not detect any physical state changes on a link, for example, when the cable is unplugged.

Default is to detects physical link state changes.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif-s 1000 vif-c 20 disable-link-detect
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif-s <vlan-id> vif-c <vlan-id> mac <xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx>

Configure user defined MAC address on given <interface>.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif-s 1000 vif-c 20 mac '00:01:02:03:04:05'
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif-s <vlan-id> vif-c <vlan-id> mtu <mtu>

Configure MTU on given <interface>. It is the size (in bytes) of the largest ethernet frame sent on this link.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif-s 1000 vif-c 20 mtu 9000
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif-s <vlan-id> vif-c <vlan-id> ip arp-cache-timeout

Once a neighbor has been found, the entry is considered to be valid for at least for this specifc time. An entry’s validity will be extended if it receives positive feedback from higher level protocols.

This defaults to 30 seconds.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif-s 1000 vif-c 20 ip arp-cache-timeout 180
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif-s <vlan-id> vif-c <vlan-id> ip disable-arp-filter

If set the kernel can respond to arp requests with addresses from other interfaces. This may seem wrong but it usually makes sense, because it increases the chance of successful communication. IP addresses are owned by the complete host on Linux, not by particular interfaces. Only for more complex setups like load-balancing, does this behaviour cause problems.

If not set (default) allows you to have multiple network interfaces on the same subnet, and have the ARPs for each interface be answered based on whether or not the kernel would route a packet from the ARP’d IP out that interface (therefore you must use source based routing for this to work).

In other words it allows control of which cards (usually 1) will respond to an arp request.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif-s 1000 vif-c 20 ip disable-arp-filter
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif-s <vlan-id> vif-c <vlan-id> ip disable-forwarding

Configure interface-specific Host/Router behaviour. If set, the interface will switch to host mode and IPv6 forwarding will be disabled on this interface.

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif-s 1000 vif-c 20 ip disable-forwarding
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif-s <vlan-id> vif-c <vlan-id> ip enable-arp-accept

Define behavior for gratuitous ARP frames who’s IP is not already present in the ARP table. If configured create new entries in the ARP table.

Both replies and requests type gratuitous arp will trigger the ARP table to be updated, if this setting is on.

If the ARP table already contains the IP address of the gratuitous arp frame, the arp table will be updated regardless if this setting is on or off.

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif-s 1000 vif-c 20 ip enable-arp-accept
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif-s <vlan-id> vif-c <vlan-id> ip enable-arp-announce

Define different restriction levels for announcing the local source IP address from IP packets in ARP requests sent on interface.

Use any local address, configured on any interface if this is not set.

If configured, try to avoid local addresses that are not in the target’s subnet for this interface. This mode is useful when target hosts reachable via this interface require the source IP address in ARP requests to be part of their logical network configured on the receiving interface. When we generate the request we will check all our subnets that include the target IP and will preserve the source address if it is from such subnet. If there is no such subnet we select source address according to the rules for level 2.

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif-s 1000 vif-c 20 ip enable-arp-announce
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif-s <vlan-id> vif-c <vlan-id> ip enable-arp-ignore

Define different modes for sending replies in response to received ARP requests that resolve local target IP addresses:

If configured, reply only if the target IP address is local address configured on the incoming interface.

If this option is unset (default), reply for any local target IP address, configured on any interface.

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif-s 1000 vif-c 20 ip enable-arp-ignore
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif-s <vlan-id> vif-c <vlan-id> ip enable-proxy-arp

Use this command to enable proxy Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) on this interface. Proxy ARP allows an Ethernet interface to respond with its own MAC address to ARP requests for destination IP addresses on subnets attached to other interfaces on the system. Subsequent packets sent to those destination IP addresses are forwarded appropriately by the system.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif-s 1000 vif-c 20 ip enable-proxy-arp
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif-s <vlan-id> vif-c <vlan-id> ip proxy-arp-pvlan

Private VLAN proxy arp. Basically allow proxy arp replies back to the same interface (from which the ARP request/solicitation was received).

This is done to support (ethernet) switch features, like RFC 3069, where the individual ports are NOT allowed to communicate with each other, but they are allowed to talk to the upstream router. As described in RFC 3069, it is possible to allow these hosts to communicate through the upstream router by proxy_arp’ing.

Note

Don’t need to be used together with proxy_arp.

This technology is known by different names:

  • In RFC 3069 it is called VLAN Aggregation
  • Cisco and Allied Telesyn call it Private VLAN
  • Hewlett-Packard call it Source-Port filtering or port-isolation
  • Ericsson call it MAC-Forced Forwarding (RFC Draft)
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif-s <vlan-id> vif-c <vlan-id> ip source-validation <strict | loose | disable>

Enable policy for source validation by reversed path, as specified in RFC 3704. Current recommended practice in RFC 3704 is to enable strict mode to prevent IP spoofing from DDos attacks. If using asymmetric routing or other complicated routing, then loose mode is recommended.

  • strict: Each incoming packet is tested against the FIB and if the interface is not the best reverse path the packet check will fail. By default failed packets are discarded.
  • loose: Each incoming packet’s source address is also tested against the FIB and if the source address is not reachable via any interface the packet check will fail.
  • disable: No source validation
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif-s <vlan-id> vif-c <vlan-id> ipv6 address autoconf

SLAAC RFC 4862. IPv6 hosts can configure themselves automatically when connected to an IPv6 network using the Neighbor Discovery Protocol via ICMPv6 router discovery messages. When first connected to a network, a host sends a link-local router solicitation multicast request for its configuration parameters; routers respond to such a request with a router advertisement packet that contains Internet Layer configuration parameters.

Note

This method automatically disables IPv6 traffic forwarding on the interface in question.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif-s 1000 vif-c 20 ipv6 address autoconf
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif-s <vlan-id> vif-c <vlan-id> ipv6 address eui64 <prefix>

EUI-64 as specified in RFC 4291 allows a host to assign iteslf a unique 64-Bit IPv6 address.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif-s 1000 vif-c 20 ipv6 address eui64 2001:db8:beef::/64
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif-s <vlan-id> vif-c <vlan-id> ipv6 address no-default-link-local

Do not assign a link-local IPv6 address to this interface.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif-s 1000 vif-c 20 ipv6 address no-default-link-local
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif-s <vlan-id> vif-c <vlan-id> ipv6 disable-forwarding

Configure interface-specific Host/Router behaviour. If set, the interface will switch to host mode and IPv6 forwarding will be disabled on this interface.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif-s 1000 vif-c 20 ipv6 disable-forwarding
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif-s <vlan-id> vif-c <vlan-id> vrf <vrf>

Place interface in given VRF instance.

See also

There is an entire chapter about how to configure a VRF, please check this for additional information.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif-s 1000 vif-c 20 vrf red

DHCP(v6)

set interfaces wireless <interface> vif-s <vlan-id> vif-c <vlan-id> dhcp-options client-id <description>

RFC 2131 states: The client MAY choose to explicitly provide the identifier through the ‘client identifier’ option. If the client supplies a ‘client identifier’, the client MUST use the same ‘client identifier’ in all subsequent messages, and the server MUST use that identifier to identify the client.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif-s 1000 vif-c 20 dhcp-options client-id 'foo-bar'
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif-s <vlan-id> vif-c <vlan-id> dhcp-options host-name <hostname>

Instead of sending the real system hostname to the DHCP server, overwrite the host-name with this given-value.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif-s 1000 vif-c 20 dhcp-options host-name 'VyOS'
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif-s <vlan-id> vif-c <vlan-id> dhcp-options vendor-class-id <vendor-id>

The vendor-class-id option can be used to request a specific class of vendor options from the server.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif-s 1000 vif-c 20 dhcp-options vendor-class-id 'VyOS'
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif-s <vlan-id> vif-c <vlan-id> dhcp-options no-default-route

Only request an address from the DHCP server but do not request a default gateway.

Example:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif-s 1000 vif-c 20 dhcp-options no-default-route
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif-s <vlan-id> vif-c <vlan-id> dhcpv6-options duid <duid>

The DHCP unique identifier (DUID) is used by a client to get an IP address from a DHCPv6 server. It has a 2-byte DUID type field, and a variable-length identifier field up to 128 bytes. Its actual length depends on its type. The server compares the DUID with its database and delivers configuration data (address, lease times, DNS servers, etc.) to the client.

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif-s 1000 vif-c 20 duid '0e:00:00:01:00:01:27:71:db:f0:00:50:56:bf:c5:6d'
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif-s <vlan-id> vif-c <vlan-id> dhcpv6-options parameters-only

This statement specifies dhcp6c to only exchange informational configuration parameters with servers. A list of DNS server addresses is an example of such parameters. This statement is useful when the client does not need stateful configuration parameters such as IPv6 addresses or prefixes.

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif-s 1000 vif-c 20 dhcpv6-options parameters-only
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif-s <vlan-id> vif-c <vlan-id> dhcpv6-options rapid-commit

When rapid-commit is specified, dhcp6c will include a rapid-commit option in solicit messages and wait for an immediate reply instead of advertisements.

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif-s 1000 vif-c 20 dhcpv6-options rapid-commit
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif-s <vlan-id> vif-c <vlan-id> dhcpv6-options temporary

Request only a temporary address and not form an IA_NA (Identity Association for Non-temporary Addresses) partnership.

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif-s 1000 vif-c 20 dhcpv6-options temporary

DHCPv6 Prefix Delegation (PD)

VyOS 1.3 (equuleus) supports DHCPv6-PD (RFC 3633). DHCPv6 Prefix Delegation is supported by most ISPs who provide native IPv6 for consumers on fixed networks.

set interfaces wireless <interface> vif-s <vlan-id> vif-c <vlan-id> dhcpv6-options pd <id> length <length>

Some ISPs by default only delegate a /64 prefix. To request for a specific prefix size use this option to request for a bigger delegation for this pd <id>. This value is in the range from 32 - 64 so you could request up to a /32 prefix (if your ISP allows this) down to a /64 delegation.

The default value corresponds to 64.

To request a /56 prefix from your ISP use:

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif-s 1000 vif-c 20 dhcpv6-options pd 0 length 56
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif-s <vlan-id> vif-c <vlan-id> dhcpv6-options pd <id> interface <delegatee> address <address>

Specify the interface address used locally on the interfcae where the prefix has been delegated to. ID must be a decimal integer.

It will be combined with the delegated prefix and the sla-id to form a complete interface address. The default is to use the EUI-64 address of the interface.

Example: Delegate a /64 prefix to interface eth8 which will use a local address on this router of <prefix>::ffff, as the address 65534 will correspond to ffff in hexadecimal notation.

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif-s 1000 vif-c 20 dhcpv6-options pd 0 interface eth8 address 65534
set interfaces wireless <interface> vif-s <vlan-id> vif-c <vlan-id> dhcpv6-options pd <id> interface <delegatee> sla-id <id>

Specify the identifier value of the site-level aggregator (SLA) on the interface. ID must be a decimal number greater then 0 which fits in the length of SLA IDs (see below).

Example: If ID is 1 and the client is delegated an IPv6 prefix 2001:db8:ffff::/48, dhcp6c will combine the two values into a single IPv6 prefix, 2001:db8:ffff:1::/64, and will configure the prefix on the specified interface.

set interfaces wireless wlan0 vif-s 1000 vif-c 20 dhcpv6-options pd 0 interface eth8 sla-id 1

Operation

show interfaces wireless info

Use this command to view operational status and wireless-specific information about all wireless interfaces.

vyos@vyos:~$ show interfaces wireless info
Interface  Type          SSID                         Channel
wlan0      access-point  VyOS-TEST-0                        1
show interfaces wireless detail

Use this command to view operational status and details wireless-specific information about all wireless interfaces.

vyos@vyos:~$ show interfaces wireless detail
wlan0: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue state UP group default qlen 1000
    link/ether XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:c3 brd XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:ff
    inet xxx.xxx.99.254/24 scope global wlan0
       valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    inet6 fe80::xxxx:xxxx:fe54:2fc3/64 scope link
       valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever

    RX:  bytes    packets     errors    dropped    overrun      mcast
         66072        282          0          0          0          0
    TX:  bytes    packets     errors    dropped    carrier collisions
         83413        430          0          0          0          0

wlan1: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue state UP group default qlen 1000
    link/ether XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:c3 brd XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:ff
    inet xxx.xxx.100.254/24 scope global wlan0
       valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    inet6 fe80::xxxx:xxxx:ffff:2ed3/64 scope link
       valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever

    RX:  bytes    packets     errors    dropped    overrun      mcast
         166072      5282          0          0          0          0
    TX:  bytes    packets     errors    dropped    carrier collisions
         183413      5430          0          0          0          0
show interfaces wireless <wlanX>

This command shows both status and statistics on the specified wireless interface. The wireless interface identifier can range from wlan0 to wlan999.

vyos@vyos:~$ show interfaces wireless wlan0
wlan0: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue state UP group default qlen 1000
    link/ether XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:c3 brd XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:ff
    inet xxx.xxx.99.254/24 scope global wlan0
       valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    inet6 fe80::xxxx:xxxx:fe54:2fc3/64 scope link
       valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever

    RX:  bytes    packets     errors    dropped    overrun      mcast
         66072        282          0          0          0          0
    TX:  bytes    packets     errors    dropped    carrier collisions
         83413        430          0          0          0          0
show interfaces wireless <wlanX> brief

This command gives a brief status overview of a specified wireless interface. The wireless interface identifier can range from wlan0 to wlan999.

vyos@vyos:~$ show interfaces wireless wlan0 brief
Codes: S - State, L - Link, u - Up, D - Down, A - Admin Down
Interface        IP Address                        S/L  Description
---------        ----------                        ---  -----------
wlan0            192.168.2.254/24                    u/u
show interfaces wireless <wlanX> queue

Use this command to view wireless interface queue information. The wireless interface identifier can range from wlan0 to wlan999.

vyos@vyos:~$ show interfaces wireless wlan0 queue
qdisc pfifo_fast 0: root bands 3 priomap 1 2 2 2 1 2 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
 Sent 810323 bytes 6016 pkt (dropped 0, overlimits 0 requeues 0)
 rate 0bit 0pps backlog 0b 0p requeues 0
show interfaces wireless <wlanX> scan

This command is used to retrieve information about WAP within the range of your wireless interface. This command is useful on wireless interfaces configured in station mode.

Note

Scanning is not supported on all wireless drivers and wireless hardware. Refer to your driver and wireless hardware documentation for further details.

vyos@vyos:~$ show interfaces wireless wlan0 scan
Address            SSID                          Channel  Signal (dbm)
00:53:3b:88:6e:d8  WLAN-576405                         1  -64.00
00:53:3b:88:6e:da  Telekom_FON                         1  -64.00
00:53:00:f2:c2:a4  BabyView_F2C2A4                     6  -60.00
00:53:3b:88:6e:d6  Telekom_FON                       100  -72.00
00:53:3b:88:6e:d4  WLAN-576405                       100  -71.00
00:53:44:a4:96:ec  KabelBox-4DC8                      56  -81.00
00:53:d9:7a:67:c2  WLAN-741980                         1  -75.00
00:53:7c:99:ce:76  Vodafone Homespot                   1  -86.00
00:53:44:a4:97:21  KabelBox-4DC8                       1  -78.00
00:53:44:a4:97:21  Vodafone Hotspot                    1  -79.00
00:53:44:a4:97:21  Vodafone Homespot                   1  -79.00
00:53:86:40:30:da  Telekom_FON                         1  -86.00
00:53:7c:99:ce:76  Vodafone Hotspot                    1  -86.00
00:53:44:46:d2:0b  Vodafone Hotspot                    1  -87.00

Examples

The following example creates a WAP. When configuring multiple WAP interfaces, you must specify unique IP addresses, channels, Network IDs commonly referred to as SSID, and MAC addresses.

The WAP in this example has the following characteristics:

  • IP address 192.168.2.1/24
  • Network ID (SSID) TEST
  • WPA passphrase 12345678
  • Use 802.11n protocol
  • Wireless channel 1
set interfaces wireless wlan0 address '192.168.2.1/24'
set interfaces wireless wlan0 type access-point
set interfaces wireless wlan0 channel 1
set interfaces wireless wlan0 mode n
set interfaces wireless wlan0 ssid 'TEST'
set interfaces wireless wlan0 security wpa mode wpa2
set interfaces wireless wlan0 security wpa cipher CCMP
set interfaces wireless wlan0 security wpa passphrase '12345678'

Resulting in

interfaces {
  [...]
  wireless wlan0 {
        address 192.168.2.1/24
        channel 1
        mode n
        security {
            wpa {
                cipher CCMP
                mode wpa2
                passphrase "12345678"
            }
        }
        ssid "TEST"
        type access-point
    }
}
system {
  [...]
  wifi-regulatory-domain DE
}

To get it to work as an access point with this configuration you will need to set up a DHCP server to work with that network. You can - of course - also bridge the Wireless interface with any configured bridge (Bridge) on the system.